あさラジオ Ep.79「赤ちゃんの教育(きょういく)」

Momoko To Nihongo あさラジオ Ep.79

Listen from Here🎧

📸 Instagram: momoko.nihongo

📽 Youtube: Momoko To Nihongo Channel

👤   Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MomokoNihongo


Patreon

Thank you for your support!

Become a Patron!

Patreon Momoko To Nihongo

Flashcards (Patreon only)

Request your topic

Instagram: momoko.nihongo

 

Support

 

2021年7月8日(木)

今日の天気は雨。最高気温は28度です。蒸し暑いですね。「蒸し暑い」はわかりますか?これは、humid and hotという意味ですね。蒸します means “to steam”、なので、「蒸し暑い」はsteaming hot ? みたいなイメージですね。笑

「むしむししている」とも言います。今日は、むしむししていますね〜。

 

最近、あさラジオの更新が遅くてごめんなさい!

実は、大学院に入るための勉強をしています。大学院 is graduate school, 入る to enter, Verb + ため = in order to … 、I am studying in order to enter a graduate school.

テストは今年の9月にあるから、ちょっと忙しいんです。すみません。でもあさラジオは続けますよ!

 

あさラジオのトピックをリクエストしてくれる人は、インスタグラムでお願いします。

Patreonでは特別エピソードも作っています。

私のホームページに日本語と英語のスクリプトがありますので、ぜひチェックしてください。

If you have any requests, go check and follow my Instagram.

I also make some special episodes for my Patreon.

 

________

 

今日のトピックは「日本の赤ちゃんの教育」です。

赤ちゃん is baby, 教育 is education

 

今日は、日本の赤ちゃんの教育について話そうと思います。

 

最近、おもしろい本を読みました。日本の赤ちゃんと、アメリカの赤ちゃんの教育を比べた研究について書かれている本です。

比べる:to compare, 研究:research

 

日本とアメリカでは、赤ちゃんと話す時や、赤ちゃんを叱る時で、話し方がちょっと違うんです。

叱る:to scold

Comparing Japan and the United States, the way you talk is a little bit different when you talk to your baby or when you scold your baby.

 

例えば、赤ちゃんと話す時。

日本では、「おおお」「うんうん」「あーあー」「そうなの〜」「すごいね〜」

というように、相槌を打つことはとても多いです。

相槌を打つ = to give responses

ふーん、へえ〜、ほうほう、うんうん、あ〜、など、日本には、「非言語的な」nonlinguistic 表現をたくさん使います。

 

でもアメリカではどうでしょうか?

アメリカでは、赤ちゃんと話す時はこんな感じだと思います。

“You going to talk a little bit?” “What do you mean?” “Why you give me your finger?” “Can I tell you something?” など、ちゃんと言葉を使って話すことが多いんですね。

 

おもしろいですよね。

で、こういう話し方の違いは、赤ちゃんの育ち方にも影響してきます。

育ち方:how you grow up, 影響する:to have a influence, have an effect

These differences in speaking style also affect how your baby grows up.

 

日本では、赤ちゃんが泣いたり怒ったり笑ったりする時、「どうして泣いているの?」「どうして笑っているの?」などはあまり聞きません。

日本人は「察する」からです。

When a baby cries, gets angry, or laughs, in Japan we don’t really ask, “Why are you crying?” Or “Why are you laughing?”

「察する」 is to get a message without asking, to try to know what someone’s trying to tell you.

 

だから日本では、赤ちゃんに自然に「察する」ことを教えています。

これは日本の社会に必要な能力だからです。

 

Therefore, in Japan, we naturally teach babies how to “take a message from someone without any actual words”.

This is because it is a necessary skill for Japanese society.

 

だから、お母さんが怒っている時も「なんでお母さんが怒っているのか、自分で考えなさい!」って言うし、

(Think carefully why mommy is angry!)

 

あとは、赤ちゃんが他の赤ちゃんのおもちゃを取ろうとした時には

「そのおもちゃは、あなたのじゃないのよ。お友達のおもちゃだよ。」って言うんですけど、あんまり「お友達のだから返しなさい。人の物を取るのは悪いことよ」とはハッキリと言わないことが多いです。

 

Also, when the baby takes another baby’s toy

His mother would say, “That toy isn’t yours. It’s a friend’s toy.”

But she wouldn’t really tell him too clearly, like “It is your friend’s toy, so give it back. It’s bad to take someone else’s things.”

 

おもしろいですよね。

こうやって、文化の違いや、社会の価値観の違いが自然と育つわけです。

 

はい、今日も聞いてくれてありがとうございました。

じゃあ、またね!


Thursday, July 8, 2021
The weather today is rainy. The maximum temperature is 28 degrees. It’s hot and humid. Do you know “steamy”? This means humid and hot, doesn’t it? It means “to steam”, so “steaming hot” is like steaming hot ?. Lol
It is also said to be “mushy”. I’m sick today.

Sorry for the late update of Asa Radio lately!
Actually, I am studying to enter graduate school. Graduate school is graduate school, enter to enter, Verb + for = in order to…, I am studying in order to enter a graduate school.
The test is in September of this year, so I’m a little busy. Excuse me. But the radio will continue!

If you would like to request a topic on Asa Radio, please use Instagram.
Patreon also makes special episodes.
There are Japanese and English scripts on my homepage, so please check them out.
If you have any requests, go check and follow my Instagram.
I also make some special episodes for my Patreon.

________

Today’s topic is “Education of Japanese Babies”.
Baby is baby, education is education

Today I would like to talk about Japanese baby education.

I recently read an interesting book. This book is about a study comparing the education of Japanese babies and American babies.
Compare: to compare, Research: research

In Japan and the United States, the way you talk is a little different when you talk to your baby or when you scold your baby.
Scold: to scold
Comparing Japan and the United States, the way you talk is a little bit different when you talk to your baby or when you scold your baby.

For example, when talking to a baby.
In Japan, “Oh”, “Yeah”, “Ahhh”, “That’s right”, “Wow!”
So, it’s very common to hit the aizuchi.
Aizuchi = to give responses
Hmm, hey, how, yeah, yeah, etc., we use a lot of “non-verbal” nonlinguistic expressions in Japan.

But what about America?
In America, I think it’s like this when talking to a baby.
I often speak in words, such as “You going to talk a little bit?”, “What do you mean?”, “Why you give me your finger?”, “Can I tell you something?”.

It’s interesting, isn’t it?
So, these differences in speaking style also affect how your baby grows up.
How to grow up: how you grow up, influence: to have a influence, have an effect
These differences in speaking style also affect how your baby grows up.

In Japan, when a baby cries, gets angry, or laughs, he doesn’t often ask “why are you crying?” Or “why are you laughing?”
This is because the Japanese “guess”.
When a baby cries, gets angry, or laughs, in Japan we do n’t really ask, “Why are you crying?” Or “Why are you laughing?”
“I guess” is to get a message without asking, to try to know what someone ’s trying to tell you.

That’s why in Japan, we teach babies to “see” naturally.
This is because it is a necessary ability for Japanese society.

Therefore, in Japan, we naturally teach babies how to “take a message from someone without any actual words”.
This is because it is a necessary skill for Japanese society.

So when she’s angry, she says, “Why she’s angry, she thinks for herself!”
(Think carefully why mommy is angry!)

Also, when the baby tries to pick up another baby’s toy
He says, “That toy isn’t yours. It’s a friend’s toy.” But it’s clear that “I’m a friend, so give it back. It’s bad to take someone else’s things.” I often don’t say that.

Also, when the baby takes another baby’s toy
His mother would say, “That toy isn’t yours. It’s a friend’s toy.”
But she would n’t really tell him too clearly, like “It is your friend ’s toy, so give it back. It ’s bad to take someone else ’s things.”

It’s interesting, isn’t it?
In this way, cultural differences and social values ​​grow naturally.

Yes, thank you for listening today.
see you later!

Follow me!

Liked it? Take a second to support Momoko Sensei on Patreon!